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1/20/2018
Sand Pine Reduction to Help Rare Species - Lake McLeod Tract of LWR-NWR (1/20/2018)

1/20/2018
Growing UP WILD at Selby Gardens! Sarasota County

Prepare Kestrel Nest Sites for Upcoming Surveys - Platt Branch & Clements
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Prepare Kestrel Nest Sites for Upcoming Surveys - Platt Branch & Clements

We’ll meet in Lake Placid's Florida Hospital parking lot and then travel in the FWC vehicle to FWC Clements and then FWC Platt Branch, where we’ll check, repair, and add nesting material to the kestrel boxes. We’ll also be trimming any too-tall vegetation around the poles. Maximum of four people needed, and you can participate at just one or both of the sites.

 Export to Your Calendar 2/3/2018
When: From 8 AM to around 1 PM
Where: Map this event »
Meet in the parking lot - Florida Hospital Lake Placid
1210 US 27
Lake Placid, Florida  33852
United States
Contact: Bill Parken
863 441 0791


Online registration is available until: 2/3/2018
« Go to Upcoming Event List  


The Kestrel nesting season will be starting in April, and the nest boxes at the monitoring sites need to be checked & prepared for the upcoming surveys!


We’ll meet in the parking lot of Florida Hospital/Lake Placid and then travel in the FWC vehicle to FWC Clements and then FWC Platt Branch, where we’ll check, repair, and add nesting material to the kestrel boxes.

We’ll also be trimming any too-tall vegetation around the poles

A Ridge Ranger adds nesting material to a kestrel nest box.


Although we’ll be moving to the monitoring sites by vehicle, please dress for working in light brush with good footwear, long pants/long sleeves, and a hat. Please also bring your work gloves and a hiker’s water bottle or similar.

Some ladder climbing may be needed for the box maintenance, but you can work on the ground as preferred.

Maximum of four people needed, and you can participate at just one or both of the sites.



The Southeastern American Kestrel (Falco sparverius paulus) is a non-migratory subspecies of kestrel found in open pine savannahs, sandhills, prairies, and pastures in Florida and the southeastern United States. It is listed as threatened in Florida due to a decline in nesting and foraging habitat. In the training you'll learn how biologists are using nest box programs to increase populations of this rare bird.


About Platt Branch Wildlife and Environmental Area:

Platt Branch WEA comprises 1,972 acres and is located about 16 miles south of Lake Placid, east of Fisheating Creek. Diverse natural communities at Platt Branch provide habitat for wildlife and include well-managed pine flatwoods, scrub, cutthroatgrass seeps, and wetlands such as depression marshes and floodplain swamps. These habitats support a remarkable diversity of wildlife, including protected species such as the gopher tortoise, fox squirrel, Florida scrub-jay and red-cockaded woodpecker.

The area that is now the Platt Branch WEA was listed as “unexplored prairie” on a
government map from the 1850s. The area remained virtually unsettled and was used for hunting, grazing, settlement and timbering over the years. Most of the major land-use changes started during the 1900s, with turpentine and timber industries booming during the 1920s. Several older pines still provide evidence of turpentining scars. Timber harvesting slowed until the late 1980s when about 100 acres of pines were cut in the southwestern segment. Platt Branch was identified by FWC personnel during the late 1980s as a site for potential state acquisition because of its value to listed species and high quality natural plant communities. The property was acquired by the state in 1995.


About the FWC Clements Unit

The FWC Clements Tract is located just to the west of the Royce Unit but is accessed from US 27. It's part of the Lake Wales Ridge Wildlife and Environmental Area, and is mostly scrub habitat, one of the most distinctive natural community on the Lake Wales Ridge WEA.

Healthy scrub has the appearance of a miniature forest with trees seldom taller than 10 feet and open patches of sand. The WEA contains 20 of 22 federally listed plant species known to occur on the Lake Wales Ridge.